5 Ways You Can Turn Weaknesses Into Strengths

In our constant quest to be the best version of ourselves possible, we find ourselves constantly nitpicking, looking at our flaws through a magnifying glass. What we see scares us, fearing that we may never be able to turn things around no matter how much effort we put in.

As martial artists, it’s in our nature to be resilient. After all, it’s been ingrained in us the moment we decided to bump fists with our training partners and begin our martial arts journey. We’ve learned to roll with the punches (literally) and deal with it, because it’s what martial artists do.

We all know it isn’t easy to eliminate our weaknesses. But instead of throwing in the towel and accepting our fate, we could put our foot down and try.

Today, Evolve Daily shares 5 Ways You Can Turn Weaknesses Into Strengths:

1) Leave your ego at the door

ONE Superstar Christian Lee is the youngest member of the Evolve Fight Team.

ONE Superstar Christian Lee is the youngest member of the Evolve Fight Team.

One of the most humbling moments a martial artist could ever experience is a loss to an opponent. Learning how to accept that loss with grace and understanding what lead you to that point can certainly teach you a thing or two.

Often times, we let our ego get in the way of our learning. This could hinder us from becoming better martial artists because we refuse to acknowledge that we’ve made a mistake.

 

2) Get out of your comfort zone

BJJ is also known as the game of human chess.

BJJ is also known as the game of human chess.

It is normal for people to naturally gravitate towards something they are good at. Whether it’s martial arts, sports, graphic design – people like to be comfortable and they like to stay there. 

Unfortunately, this safety net we’ve created is what is preventing us from becoming better martial artists. By exploring new options and allowing ourselves to fail every now and then, we open ourselves to finding new strengths.

 

3) Talk to your instructor

 2x Muay Thai Rajdamnern World Champion and a 2x Thailand Boxing Champion Muangfalek Kiatvichian is known for his ferocious punches and kicks with a unique and original style.

2x Muay Thai Rajdamnern World Champion and a 2x Thailand Boxing Champion Muangfalek Kiatvichian is known for his ferocious punches and kicks with a unique and original style.

If there’s someone who can pinpoint exactly what your weaknesses are, it’s your instructor. He’s been there with you through your entire martial arts journey. He’s seen you grow both as a martial artist and as an individual.

Don’t hesitate to talk to your instructor after class. Ask him how you can improve and become a better student. And don’t just take his advice with a grain of salt – follow it. Who knows, it just might work.

 

4) Put in the work 

ONE Superstar Eddie Ng works on his striking with multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Chaowalith Jockey Gym.

ONE Superstar Eddie Ng works on his striking with multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Chaowalith Jockey Gym.

Even if you’ll never be the next Bruce Lee or Roger Gracie, it doesn’t mean that you should stop putting in all that effort. Your martial arts journey becomes more full and rich with all the trial and error you’ve been through. 

Remember, learning martial arts is always worth the extra effort. By putting in the hours to achieve just a little bit of success, you’re already so much better off.

 

5) Make mistakes every now and then

UFC Lightweight World Champion Rafael Dos Anjos started training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at the age of 13.

UFC Lightweight World Champion Rafael Dos Anjos started training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at the age of 13.

As martial arts students, its normal to forget a technique every now and then or lose a spar. Everyone has their good days and their bad days – that’s reality. As much as we would all love to be the best martial artist out there, it simply isn’t possible. 

Instead of giving ourselves impossibly high standards, we should turn them into specific goals we can actually work towards. For example, instead of saying: “I’m going to get my black belt in 4 years”, you can say: “I’m going to fix the holes in my open guard because I keep getting passed.” Doing so helps us improve slowly, but brings us all the more closer to our ultimate goal.

 

As disheartening as it may be to accept our flaws as martial artists, we need to remember that it is all part of our journey. Being harshly self-critical will only demotivate us and prevent us from moving forward. Instead, we should deal with our weaknesses in a constructive manner and use this to become even better martial artists. Who knows, it just might be what we need.

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