7 Things You Should Never Ever Do In Training

As martial artists on the quest of continuous self-improvement, we sometimes get too caught up in our journey that we fail to see what we are doing wrong. Unfortunately, the bad habits could lead to our demise. If we don’t do something to fix these immediately, we wouldn’t be able to reach our personal goals. If you’re ready to become the best martial artist you could be, Evolve Daily is here to help. Today, we share 7 Things You Should Never Ever Do In Training:

1) Think about being promoted  

muay-thai-guys

Muay Thai is also known as “the art of 8 limbs”.

Yes, everyone wants to be promoted. But being awarded a higher rank is not the be all and end all of martial arts. Anyone can buy a black belt or a purple prajead but by being rank obsessed, you’re missing out on the most important part of your martial arts journey: the experiences you went through to get there. What makes a belt/rank truly special is how you accomplished it – from being constantly tapped out by the higher belts to eventually figuring out their games and using it against them, that’s what counts.

 

2) Spaz out on all your training partners  

Seriously, there’s no need to train like you’re ready to destroy your training partner. You’re both there to learn from each other and there definitely won’t be any learning if you’re using all your strength and energy on your opponent. When you’re spazzing, you’d tend to use any technique/dirty trick (illegal or otherwise) on your opponent because you feel like you’re fighting as if your life depended on it. And, chances are, most people will probably walk away from you when it comes to picking partner. Here’s a little secret, it’s just training. There’s no need to panic. Relax and go with the flow. There’s no need to hurt your training partners!

 

3) Talk while your instructor is teaching 

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Yoddecha Sityodtong overcame adversity to follow his dreams.

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Yoddecha Sityodtong overcame adversity to follow his dreams.

Nothing is more annoying to your instructor (or other teammates for that matter) than when you talk when he/she’s trying to explain a technique. Unless you have a black belt/ world title, the odds of your instructor knowing a technique better than you do are quite high. Do yourself and everyone else a favor and actually pay attention while your instructor is teaching. Who knows, you might actually learn something new.

 

4) Be an unofficial assistant instructor 

In BJJ, you must always stay 1-2 steps ahead of your opponent.

In BJJ, you must always stay 1-2 steps ahead of your opponent.

If you see someone doing drills on the side or if you see someone sparring intensely but are doing a few techniques wrong – please stop yourself from walking over and telling him/her what he/she needs to do. If you’re sparring with someone or drilling with someone and you feel the need to correct your opponent — STOP! Nothing would irritate your teammates more than having someone at the same level as them tell them what to do. If you feel like you need to say something, wait till after class. However, make sure that what you’re about to say is 100% correct. Alternatively, you could tell your teammate to consult your instructor or a higher ranked teammate for help.

 

5) Tell your partner you want to “go light” but do the opposite  

ONE Superstar Christian Lee works on his suplex at the Evolve MMA Fighters Program.

ONE Superstar Christian Lee works on his suplex at the Evolve MMA Fighters Program.

People have many reasons for “going light”. Whether it’s an injury, or sparring with someone of a higher belt/rank, not feeling 100% — you can opt to “go light” if you still want to spar despite these things. However, you must be a man/woman of your word. When you “go light” it means you should flow with your sparring partner, not spaz out or turn up the intensity. This shows your training partner that you’re taking advantage of him/her when he/she isn’t going 100%, and that isn’t fair.

 

6) Refuse to tap  

BJJ World Champion and ONE Superstar Bruno Pucci was born and raised in Curitiba, Brazil.

BJJ World Champion and ONE Superstar Bruno Pucci was born and raised in Curitiba, Brazil.

We get it; you want to be a World Champion someday. You want to do all that you can so you can one day achieve all your goals and step on that podium to receive that gold medal. Unfortunately, you can’t do that if you’re injured. Trying to outlast a submission because you’re up against someone of a lower belt or someone physically smaller won’t get you anywhere near that podium. Tapping out is normal – everyone does it, even black belts. Don’t let your ego control you and take charge, you have better things to worry about than tapping out once or twice in sparring.

 

7) Be a training partner elitist  

When it comes to choosing sparring partners, don’t just settle for the person you regularly train with. If you want to get better at martial arts, you need to spar with a variety of partners. This means partners of different sizes, genders and skill levels. There’s something to learn from everyone, and if you keep on sparring the same people, you won’t have the chance to learn all that you can.

 

Regardless of where you are in your martial arts journey, there’s no doubt you could learn a thing or two by adapting these habits into your training. By being more open to learning and simply enjoying our martial arts journey, we’ll go farther than we could have ever imagined. So tell us, which of these bad habits will you get rid of today?

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