9 Things You Can Do To Make The Most Out Of Your Martial Arts Training

Our martial arts journey may be something we end up taking for granted, especially if we train on a regular basis. And in the end, we may lose sight of why we started training in the first place. These feelings of uncertainty are common for all martial artists. After all, it’s only natural to question your purpose when you’re feeling lost and unsure.

We at Evolve Daily understand these emotions you’re going through. We know what it’s like to wonder if your time has been wasted – or worse, be on the verge of giving up at any moment. If you’re feeling lost, unsure, or just need a little boost, then this article is definitely for you.

Today, Evolve Daily shares 9 Things You Can Do To Make The Most Of Your Martial Arts Training:

1) Ask questions.

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Pornsanae Sitmonchai demonstrates a jab.

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Pornsanae Sitmonchai demonstrates a jab.

Your instructors are there for a reason – to guide and teach you. If you need inspiration, ask your instructor about his martial arts journey – not everyone is a World Champion! If you have doubts about your techniques, ask your instructor for help. He’ll find a way for you to understand the techniques you’re having difficulties with.

 

2) Just relax.

Muay Thai instructor Daorung Sityodtong has over 48 years of experience as a professional fighter and trainer of Lumpinee Muay Thai World Champions.

Muay Thai instructor Daorung Sityodtong has over 48 years of experience as a professional fighter and trainer of Lumpinee Muay Thai World Champions.

Training martial arts isn’t just about competition (unless you’re a professional fighter, of course). The minute you step onto the mats, remember why you’re there – to learn and get better. If you’re always agitated and tense, you won’t be able to concentrate and the class you’ve attended might feel useless.

 

3) Listen to the advice you’re given.

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champions Namsaknoi Yudthagarngamtorn and Orono Wor Petchpun are known for their beautiful, technical Muay Thai.

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champions Namsaknoi Yudthagarngamtorn and Orono Wor Petchpun are known for their beautiful, technical Muay Thai.

Let’s face it, none of us are experts. We’re all on the same martial arts journey, trying to improve ourselves a little bit everyday. When an instructor or someone ranked much higher than us offers advice because we’re doing something wrong, chances are, they’re probably right.

 

4) Finish the warmup.

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Orono Wor Petchpun leads another endorphin-filled Muay Thai class!

Multiple-time Muay Thai World Champion Orono Wor Petchpun leads another endorphin-filled Muay Thai class!

As tiring as it may feel, your instructor doesn’t make you do warmups just to torture you (although it may feel like it sometimes). He’s doing it to make you a better martial artist. Regardless of your martial art of choice, warmups are a great way to condition your body for your class and gives you the strength you need to execute the techniques. If you’re feeling tired, just try to do what you can and make up for it after class.

 

5) Try different things.

Evolve FES

Boxing class at Evolve Far East Square.

Yes, we understand that you’re great at playing spider guard or that you have a killer left hook – but what about the rest of your game? To be a complete martial artist, you should have a well-rounded game. Yes, it might be ego crushing at first, but if you don’t try different things, you’ll never truly learn anything.

 

6) Use more technique than strength.

Taking your opponent down in BJJ earns you 2 points!

Taking your opponent down in BJJ earns you 2 points!

Strength is a great advantage to have in martial arts – but it can also be a disadvantage. It gives you power in your punches and submissions but it can only get you so far. If you’re used to using strength, you may find yourself relying on it more than actually executing a technique properly. You can increase strength to a point, but improving skill and technique is a lifelong process.

 

7) Drill before or after class.

You’ve probably heard the saying “drillers are killers” – there’s a reason why it exists. Martial artists who constantly drill are more likely to remember techniques, just because they’ve done it over and over again. They’ve made these movements practically second nature, so executing them during sparring is definitely a breeze.

 

8) Use the moves you learned in class.

Bagwork develops your boxing technique as well your punching power.

Bagwork develops your boxing technique as well your punching power.

Sure, it might feel safer to resort to your favorite combination or find the way to the kimura from side control, but how does this show that you’re learning anything? During sparring, why not try 1-2 moves you’ve learned in class. Not only will you find new moves to add to your arsenal of techniques, you’ll also feel more confident overall. Try it; you might just surprise yourself and your instructor.

 

9) Supplement your training with strength and conditioning.

We all need a little help – whether it’s because we’re running out of breath during sparring or feel like we’re always being overpowered, there’s always something that needs a bit of tweaking. Strength and conditioning is the best solution to this problem – just make sure it’s supplementing your training and not replacing it.

 

So tell us, which of these tips will you use today?

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