6 Ways To Improve Your Submission Game In BJJ

All BJJ practitioners can relate to the feeling of immense satisfaction each time they’ve successfully pulled off a submission. No matter how long you’ve been practicing BJJ, executing a flawless submission is no easy task.

How so?

When two people spar, their ultimate goal is to win – whether by submission or points. In order to do so, they must fight for a few minutes until the round is over using technique, speed and strength to win.

Wondering how to increase your chances of pulling off a submission in BJJ? Today, Evolve Daily reveals 6 Ways To Improve Your Submission Game in BJJ:

 

1) Anticipate your opponent’s next move

Nicholas Goh Photography - Shinya Aoki-12

Although this is a concept that can be used in many scenarios in martial arts, it is especially important when attempting submissions in BJJ. Knowing what your opponent’s next move is could make all the difference. You can prepare your attack with precision because you know what they are about to do.

Tip: Force your opponent into a certain position and work from there. Because you have him where you want him, you can adjust and find the appropriate submission from that position.

 

2) Create a chain of submissions

Leandro "Brodinho" Issa wins via armbar submission.

Having another submission as a backup to your first submission will increase your chances of submitting your opponent. Of course, if you’re able to create an actual chain of submissions, the better your odds will be.

Tip: Figure out what your favorite submission is and work from there. Try to understand why your submissions don’t work all the time and look for a solid backup plan. The more prepared you are, the more you’ll be able to do!

 

3) Find your favorite submission

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Eventually, after training BJJ for a few years or sometimes even months, you’ll find your favorite submission. And when you find your favorite submission, it will feel like a match made in heaven. You’ll always look for your favorite submission; no matter what position you’re in. Without a doubt, this increases your chances of finishing your submission. For 10x BJJ World Champion Roger Gracie, his favorite submission is the cross choke from the mount.

Tip: A good way to find your favorite submission is to look back at your spars and see which submissions you’re able to execute flawlessly more than once.

 

4) Bait your opponent into a submission

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For some BJJ practitioners, baiting their opponent into a submission is the best way to catch them. The more unpredictable you are, the more difficult it will be for your opponent to anticipate your next move.

Tip: Give your opponent an opening to make a move. Pretend to let him escape or give him a sweep. As soon as he attempts to do anything, make your move and go for your favorite submission!

 

5) Develop a solid submission game

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High-level BJJ practitioners all have one thing in common – a solid submission game. This means that they are able to submit their opponent from any position. It doesn’t matter if they’re on their back, playing top game or on back control – they have a deadly submission waiting for you!

Tip: Concentrate on submissions first and ignore counting points. Let your opponent sweep you. Be willing to take risks. Go for submissions even if you risk losing your position just to open up your game.

 

6) Find a version of a submission that works for you

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Although there aren’t any more than a dozen submissions, the number of variations for a single submission is endless. As we all know, there are new techniques discovered everyday, opening up new ways to tailor a submission to suit your style.

Tip: Revisit your arsenal of submissions and pick the one you are having the most difficulty with. Consult your instructor for the details behind that submission and what you can do to fix it. Who knows, he might reveal that one detail that could change your entire BJJ game!

 

We need to remember that there is still so much more to learn and that we should never hinder ourselves from being better BJJ practitioners. Through constant practice, trial and error, only do we improve. So tell us, which of these tips will you use in your next BJJ class?

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